Judge sides with ’60s Scoop survivors; damages to be decided

Marcia Brown Martel

By Colin Perkel THE CANADIAN PRESS TORONTO-Canada failed to take reasonable steps to prevent thousands of on-reserve children who were placed with non-native families from losing their indigenous heritage during the ’60s Scoop, an Ontario judge ruled Tuesday. The ruling in the long-running and bitterly fought class action paves the way for an assessment of damages the government will have to pay. The federal government has said it will not appeal. In siding with the plaintiffs, Ontario Superior Court Justice Edward Belobaba found Canada had breached its “duty of care” to the children. The lawsuit launched eight years ago sought $1.3 billion on behalf of about 16,000 indigenous children in Ontario who claimed they were harmed by being placed in non-aboriginal homes from 1965 to 1984 under terms of a…

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