In The News Today- Thursday Oct., 4 -Five stories in the news

FORD IN SASKATCHEWAN TO TALK CARBON TAX

ario Premier Doug Ford is bringing his anti-carbon tax crusade to Saskatchewan. Ford is to meet with Premier Scott Moe today to discuss the federal government’s carbon pricing plan and the economy. Ford said on Twitter on Wednesday that Ontario and Saskatchewan are going to stand up to what he called Prime Minister Justin Trudeau’s tax-and-spend policies. Ford’s Progressive Conservative government is challenging the federal government’s carbon pricing plan in court, while Moe’s government has asked Saskatchewan’s Court of Appeal to rule on whether the federal plan is unconstitutional. Ford will also speak Friday at a “Scrap The Carbon Tax Rally” in Calgary at the invitation of Alberta United Conservative Party leader Jason Kenney.

___

U.S. NOT INVITED TO CANADA’S WORLD TRADE ORGANIZATION SUMMIT

Canada has not included the United States in an upcoming meeting aimed at saving the international trading system because it doesn’t share the views of the 13 invited countries, says the new Canadian trade minister. Canada will host senior ministers from 13 “like-minded” countries for a two-day discussion in Ottawa later this month to brainstorm ways to reform the World Trade Organization, said Jim Carr, Canada’s newly appointed international trade diversification minister. Carr said the group of countries he’s convened ultimately wants to persuade Washington of the continued usefulness of the WTO, but for now the best way forward is without the U.S. in the room.

___

INDIGENOUS KIDS STILL NOT TREATED FAIRLY: ADVOCATE

A First Nations children’s advocate says Indigenous kids are still not being treated equally because provinces and territories are shirking their responsibilities. Cindy Blackstock, the executive director of the **>First Nations<** Child and Family Caring Society, told the inquiry into missing and murdered Indigenous women that provinces are still denying Indigenous kids access to services that are available to non-Indigenous kids. The inquiry is holding hearings in Winnipeg this week focused on child welfare. Despite a ruling from the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal, Blackstock said provinces still aren’t adhering to Jordan’s Principle, which stipulates Indigenous kids should get access to services without delays caused by jurisdictional issues.

___

FUTURE UNCERTAIN FOR VANCOUVER POT SHOPS

Cannabis connoisseurs in Vancouver have been able to buy potent weed over the counter for years _ but ironically, that could change when marijuana becomes legal. None of the long-standing pot shops in the city have received provincial licences to operate, with only two weeks left until legalization. Vancouver became a haven for illegal pot shops after the city _ in an effort to ensure access for medical marijuana patients _ decided not to police the stores unless there were public safety concerns, such as gang affiliations or sales to minors. The entire system changes on Oct. 17 and _ if the law is enforced _ Vancouver could go from being Canada’s most pot-friendly city to one of its least.

____

NEW TRADE DEAL COULD AFFECT SUPER BOWL ADS

Canada’s new trade agreement with the United States and Mexico, known as USMCA, obliges Ottawa to get rid of a two-year-old rule that prohibits cable and satellite companies from blocking U.S.

signals during the Super Bowl. The rule was put in place in response to public feedback that many Canadians preferred to see the American version of the Super Bowl broadcasts. But fans of Canadian advertisers are hoping domestic ads will now muscle out their competition for the first time since 2016, the last year that simultaneous substitution of U.S. signals was allowed during the big game. USMCA, specifically Annex 15-D in the chapter covering cross-border trade in services, binds Canada to rescind a special Super Bowl provision established by the Canadian Radio-television and Telecommunications Commission.

___

ALSO IN THE NEWS:

-Prime Minister Justin Trudeau will meet with dairy industry leaders in Montreal.

-The trial continues today of British sailor Darren Smalley, who is accused of sexual assault in an alleged incident at a Halifax naval base in April 2015.

-Transport Minister Marc Garneau testifies before the Senate banking committee about the committee’s call for a new, east-west national trade corridor through Canada’s northern regions.

– A march and vigil will be held in Montreal to honour the memories of missing and murdered Indigenous women.

Add Your Voice

Is there more to this story? We'd like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Contribute your voice on our contribute page.