Boston Marathon paying tribute to 2 time Indigenous champion 

By William J. Kole THE ASSOCIATED PRESS BOSTON (AP)- Organizers of the Boston Marathon publicly apologized for running the 125th edition of the planet’s most celebrated footrace on Indigenous Peoples Day. Now they’re seeking to make amends by throwing the spotlight on a member of Rhode Island’s Narragansett tribe who won the race twice in the 1930s and inspired the name “Heartbreak Hill” to describe the most iconic, and dreaded, section of the course. The Boston Athletic Association, which administers the marathon, said Monday it will honor the legacy of the late Ellison “Tarzan” Brown, Boston’s champion in 1936 and 1939, in the run-up to the race’s pandemic-altered Oct. 11 staging. The Boston Marathon traditionally is held in mid-April on Massachusetts’ unique Patriots Day holiday. In 2020, it was canceled in…

This content is for Yearly Subscription and Yearly Subscription – Corporate members only.
Log In Register

Add Your Voice

Is there more to this story? We'd like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Contribute your voice on our contribute page.