Ontario residents encouraged to look for meteorite pieces

By The Canadian Press

Scientists are calling on people in Ontario’s Niagara region to keep an eye out for pieces of a meteorite that crashed down in the area this weekend.

Residents in the area between Toronto and Hamilton were able to see the meteorite lighting up the sky early on Saturday morning.

A space rock shown. Scientists are calling on people in Ontario’s Niagara region to keep an eye out for pieces of a meteorite that crashed down in the area this weekend. Photo: Raphael Wild.

Many  Southern Ontario residents were shocked out of their slumber just before 3.30 a.m. on Saturday by the sound of a loud boom.

The disturbance was that of a one-metre meteor crashing into the earth’s atmosphere near Brantford.

https://ca.sports.yahoo.com/video/asteroid-caught-over-brantford-234639772.html

Peter Brown, a Western University physicist, says the meteorite weighed about 500 kilograms and was less than a metre in diametre when it entered the Earth’s atmosphere around 3:25 a.m. on Saturday.

He says people living in the area between Toronto to Hamilton heard the sonic boom the meteorite caused as it was moving about 40 times the speed of sound before it broke up in the atmosphere.

Brown says his research group believes small pieces of the meteorite made it to the south shore of Lake Ontario, around Grimsby and Vineland, and larger pieces that could weigh several kilograms landed north of St. Catharines.

Kim Tait, mineralogy, meteorite and gem curator at the Royal Ontario Museum (ROM), says a group of researchers surveyed the area looking for the space rocks over the weekend, but they couldn’t find anything due to the snowy weather.

Tait says some of the snow has melted down since then, and that could help people find the black magnetic pieces of the meteorite.

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