Native nations on front lines of climate change share knowledge and find support at intensive camps

By Hallie Golden THE ASSOCIATED PRESS PORT ANGELES, Wash. (AP)- Jeanette Kiokun, the tribal clerk for the Qutekcak Native Tribe in Alaska, doesn’t immediately recognize the shriveled, brown plant she finds on the shore of the Salish Sea or others that were sunburned during the long, hot summer. But a fellow student at a weeklong tribal climate camp does. They are rosehips, traditionally used in teas and baths by the Skokomish Indian Tribe in Washington state and other tribes. “It’s getting too hot, too quick,” Alisa Smith Woodruff, a member of the Skokomish tribe, said of the sun-damaged plant. Tribes suffer some of the most severe impacts of climate change in the U.S. but often have the fewest resources to respond, which makes the intensive camps on combatting the impact…

This content is for Yearly Subscription, Yearly Subscription – Corporate, and Print Subscription Only members only.
Log In Register

Add Your Voice

Is there more to this story? We'd like to hear from you about this or any other stories you think we should know about. Contribute your voice on our contribute page.