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National News

Brantford Police Investigate Gun Shot Wound

January 22, 2020 BRANTFORD, ONT- Brantford Police are investigating the circumstances surrounding a man suffering from…

Editorial

Protecting the land for the future

The Greater Toronto area has some of the fastest development growth in North America. From highway…

Mark Hill…moving foward…together

Climate changes will force environment change

Editorial Cartoons

Weekly Cartoon

Weekly Cartoon

Weekly Cartoon

Special Reports

Special Section: A Community in Transition

Is Six Nations ready for the re-building of a traditional government: -1924: The Haudenosaunee Confederacy Chiefs’ Council were forcibly ousted as the recognized governing body on Six Nations by the RCMP at gunpoint. It came after a group of community members, often referred to as “de-horners” complained about the hereditary nature of the HCCC. Those de-horners went on to become the first elected band council at Six Nations under the authority of the Indian Act. -March 5, 1959: Council House Coup D’etat: Confederacy chiefs and clanmothers, backed by community supporters,…

Turtle Island News Audio Files

The Hydro One Annual Shareholder Meeting was held on May 15, 2018.

The entire audio file can be downloaded or listened to at https://www.hydroone.com/about/corporate-information/governance/annual-shareholder-meeting-materials.

This is an excerpt from the meeting during the question and answer period where Elected Chief Ava Hill, Ron Jamieson and Matt Jamieson make comments and/or ask questions.

Other Publications

Aboriginal Business News

Aboriginal Business Magazine

Choices Educational Magazine

Choices Educational Magazine

Discover Six Nations Magazine

Discover Six Nations Magazine

Aboriginal Tourism Magazine

Aboriginal Tourism Magazine

Fore Golf Magazine

Fore Golf Magazine

Turtle Club Kids - Earth Day Edition

TCK – Earthday Edition

Turtle Club Kids - Anti-Bully

TCK – Anti-Bully

Christmas Carol Book

Christmas Carol Book

World News

Reports: Flooding risks could devalue Florida real estate 

By Associated Press THE ASSOCIATED PRESS MIAMI- Flooding due to climate change-related sea level rising, the erosion of natural barriers and long-periods of rain pose substantial economic risks to Florida, particularly to the value of South Florida real estate, according to two new reports released last week. For years, Florida lawmakers mostly ignored climate change under then-Gov. Rick Scott, who is now a U.S. Senator. But GOP Gov. Ron DeSantis has taken a more aggressive stance at tackling the issue,…

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