News Headlines

Six Nations Chiefs successfully win back to back Mann Cups

Mann Oh Mann what a feeling! (Photo By Neil Becker)
Mann Oh Mann what a feeling! (Photo By Neil Becker)

Decades from now lacrosse historians will enthusiastically reminisce about what was a magical summer of Six Nations lacrosse which fittingly concluded with the Six Nations Chiefs lifting and celebrating with the Mann Cup.

In dominating the competition Six Nations fans have reason to stick their chests out in pride as they have witnessed some life long memories which started back in May with the Rochester Knighthawks successfully defending their NLL title.

From that point everything went according to plan for Six Nations lacrosse fans who were entertained by another undefeated Rebels regular season and their fourth consecutive Founders Cup victory followed by the Arrows winning their first Minto Cup since 2007 and last but not least the Chiefs making history by defending their Mann Cup title against Victoria at what was a rocking ILA.

Fans who attended what was a gruelling six game series which saw two games settled in overtime got to witness some history as this was the very first Mann Cup series ever played on native soil which according to Chiefs coach Rich Kilgour made winning it all that much more special.

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AM I Next? Campaign kicked off a storm across Canada

Holly Jarrett posted a picture of herself and this question. It set off a social media storm. (top); The group pic from Left to Right: our writer Eulene Bomberry, Katelyn Knott and Kaylin Parker, all three are McMaster University students 2014. (bottom)
Holly Jarrett posted a picture of herself and this question. It set off a social media storm. (top); The group pic from Left to Right: our writer Eulene Bomberry, Katelyn Knott and Kaylin Parker, all three are McMaster University students 2014. (bottom)

Bella Laboucan McLean in Toronto.

Loretta Saunders in Halifax, Nova Scotia.

Tina Fontaine in Red River, Manitoba.

The list of names goes on with over 1,200 cases recorded by the RCMP of missing and murdered Indigenous women in Canada.

The Native Women’s Association of Canada (NWAC) and numerous grassroots groups have been working tirelessly for over 10 years to bring public and government attention to the disproportionate number of Indigenous women being murdered and disappeared in this country. This past summer, a social media campaign lead by Holly Jarrett, cousin of Loretta Saunders, has brought the issues into the national and international media forefront.

The campaign #AmINext was launched in late June as Holly Jarrett struggled with the loss of her cousin, Loretta Saunders. Dealing with the heartbreaking and senseless death of Loretta, Holly asked herself, “Am I next?” Next to be murdered? Next to be disappeared under suspicious circumstances?

According to NWAC research in 2010, Indigenous women in Canada are three times more likely to be murdered by strangers.

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It takes a village to raise a child...it takes a village to save a child

Derek Miller donated $2,075 to the initiative last week, raised through his family’s annual charity concert "Swinefest." (top); A long line of bagged lunches were waiting for anyone who dropped by Veteran's Park on National Suicide Awareness Day. (middle); Dorothy Russell-Patterson, (right) who along with Rev Norm Casey are spearheading the initiative, takes a minute to visit with friends (bottom); Band councillor Melba Thomas (right) and Ida Martin lent their support to get the word out on suicide prevention (right) (Photos by Donna Duric)
Derek Miller donated $2,075 to the initiative last week, raised through his family’s annual charity concert "Swinefest." (top); A long line of bagged lunches were waiting for anyone who dropped by Veteran's Park on National Suicide Awareness Day. (middle); Dorothy Russell-Patterson, (right) who along with Rev Norm Casey are spearheading the initiative, takes a minute to visit with friends (bottom); Band councillor Melba Thomas (right) and Ida Martin lent their support to get the word out on suicide prevention (right) (Photos by Donna Duric)

It may take a village to raise a child, but at Six Nations, a new battle cry is being heard, it takes a village to save a child.

A group of concerned community members with the help of the Six Nations Anglican Church are reaching out to the community, to groups and organizations to join the battle cry to combat suicide through a new initiative aptly called “Brightening the Spirit/Breaking the Silence: Suicide Awareness and Intervention.”

Reverend Norm Casey and parish member Dorothy Russell-Patterson are spearheading the new initiative which seeks to help families through the grief and recovery process after the suicide of a loved one, as well as suicide prevention, intervention, and post-intervention services.

“Statistically, we know right across the country in First Nation communities, we have a very high rate of suicide,” said Casey.

The new organization is a collaborative group of community members seeking to reduce the number of suicides and to explore life promotion strategies.

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Local News Headlines

Local News

  • Taxpayers’ Federation “belittles cultural beliefs” ... Read more
  • Community pulls together for local girl battling leukemia ... Read more
  • Haudenosaunee Confederacy asked for shelter under tree ... Read more
  • CAYUGA CONFLICT: Six Unity Council supporters take over cigarette plant ... Read more
  • Band Council holding bus tour of Grand River Tract ... Read more
  • Government releases plan to fight violence against aboriginal women ... Read more
  • Man fasting to get rid of Buffalo Point First Nation non-native chief ... Read more
  • Special: Health ... What Goes Around Comes Around; Reciprocal Relationships <3 ... Read more
  • Special: Car Care ... 3 things every driver needs to know ... Read more

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Local News

Community pulls together for local girl battling leukemia

Deneen “Nince” Hill holds tight onto her daughter Teiehkwa who was diagnoised with leukemia. (Photo by Donna Duric)
Deneen “Nince” Hill holds tight onto her daughter Teiehkwa who was diagnoised with leukemia. (Photo by Donna Duric)

The mother of an 11-year-old Six Nations girl battling against leukemia was brought to tears last Thursday after Bicentennial Daycare staff, kids and parents raised almost $1,200 to help Teiehkwa Jada Johnson travel to Florida for special treatment.

Deneen “Nince” Hill is overwhelmed with gratitude at the community support they’ve received since discovering her daughter had leukemia.

Teiehkwa was diagnosed with leukemia this past summer after experiencing odd physical symptoms.

The girl’s older sister, Tori Johnson, said the active youngster was having trouble playing lacrosse.

“We just thought it was a lacrosse thing, like her legs were sore,” said Johnson. “One day she woke up and she tried to walk and she just fell.”

She couldn’t stand up.

That’s when the family took the young lady for medical testing where doctors discovered she had leukemia.

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Sports Headlines

Six Nations Regatta

  • Six Nations Chiefs successfully win back to back Mann Cups ... Read more
  • Special Section: Six Nations Chiefs Mann Cup Champs ... Read more
  • Looking to impress at Six Nations Pee Wee Rep tryouts ... Read more
  • Assumption Jr. Lions open season with heartbreaking loss ... Read more
  • Corvairs get blanked in home opener vs. Welland ... Read more

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Opinion

Lynda Powless, Editor

CTF... seriously, is little more than a comic affair

One can’t help but wonder what was going through the head of the Public Service Alliance of Canada (PSAC) this week when they mistakenly (we think) masterminded a major faux pas. PSAC, in its current negotiation demands to the Treasury Board listed as one of its demands giving its aboriginal members paid bereavement leave for “aboriginal spirit friends,” without any explanation. Now that might go down without a thought in a Haudenosaunee community where the term is well known. But in mainstream Canada it set off alarm bells for Sun News network, (and we all know how much the Sun network loves to trample all over any First Nation issue), giving them a chance to take yet another shot at aboriginal peoples. As soon as the reporter saw the term she immediately called, of all people, the Congress of Aboriginal Peoples, a group representing, well, urban native people, who said they didn’t know what it was. And why would they. The term is well known in Haudenosaunee communities but anywhere else in the country. No. What happened was simply the Educational and Library Science group of PSAC, that represents the remaining federal teachers, most of whom work at Six Nations and Tyendinaga, asked for leave to deal with bereavement of the loss of a very special person, a person who is there for them in their most dire need their “spirit friend.” A person ( see page 4) who helps them through their illness and because of their dedication and loyality becomes a member of their immediate family. A very special connection that stays to the grave. The local PSAC group have several members who follow the traditional beliefs of the Haudenosaunee, beliefs that have been silenced or pushed aside to meet contemporary society’s rules. Until now. This time the union locals decided enough was enough and it was time to respect Haudenosaunee cultural practices and requested an extension of the already in place five days bereavement leave to 10 days to enable its membership who are affected to take part in their ceremonial beliefs. Along comes the Canadian Taxpayers Federation (CTF) who loves to take shots at First Nations. Couple that with the Ontario Convenience Store association and the Sunmedia network and you have very strange bedfellows indeed The CTF shot off its mouth degrading the belief, not taking the time to find out first what a spirit friend is and instead launched into an insulting, degrading, demeaning tirade of “imaginary friends” “imaginary jobs” and “ghosts.” The CTF owes all Haudenosaunee an apology for its crass unfounded remarks and try as it may there is no excuse for belittling anyone’s cultural beliefs just to grab a few headlines for your organization. The CTF failed to do the homework, made no effort to contact PSAC itself, admitting it had some unknown third party try to make a phone call, and admits its owns comments were offensive..but hey so what! CTF saw a chance for a headline at the cost of First Nation beliefs and it took it. It spent all of its time coming up with disparaging insults it could level through Sun Media and any other media that would give them a headline in an attempt to legitimize themselves and what comes down to stereotypical ignorance and narrow-mindedness that should be beneath such an organization. PSAC can shoulder some of the blame here. While the union may reach out to First Nations it had an obligation to find out first from its own membership what a “spirit friend” is before it put anything in writing and it not only failed to do so, it made it worse by coming up with a ridiculous reference to the loss of an elder or leader. PSAC has Haudenosaunee people right in its unit. It had an obligation to consult them before it launched what turned into an demeaning insulting tirade by the CTF with the help of Sunmedia (who also didn’t bother to find out what Spirit friends are) who should become the focus of a press council complaint. And when it comes to “imaginary jobs” could anything be more fitting a description of the CTF after its national director Greg Thomas engaged in such offensive behaviour that can be likened to inciting ethnic or racial hatred. The CTF has trampled on the very delicate ceremonial practices of a people who are honouring their own at a very challenging, emotional time it their lives, when they lose one of their own. No one who loses their loved ones should face this kind of insult and invasion simply because they have asked to have their beliefs honoured and respected, that is unless according to the CTF you happen to be of aboriginal heritage.

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